Diavolino Italian Greyhounds

                                                                                      ...world reknowned show dogs and world class companions

 
                                             
 
 

Understanding Dog Shows

Dog shows can be very confusing when you don't know what's happening.

You may start competing with your dog at 6 months of age, although Canada allows you to enter a 3 month old puppy for Exhibition Only.  This allows your puppy to be on the grounds and absorbing the atmosphere.  If your dog or puppy is not entered in the show, it is not allowed on the grounds.

All of the breeds recognized by the Canadian Kennel Club (CKC) and the American Kennel Club (AKC) are divided into 7 Groups of dogs.  They are:

Sporting    Hounds    Working    Terriers    Toys    Non-Sporting    Herding

The AKC is looking at changing to 10 groups, but that won't be for awhile so we'll not worry about that right now.

Within each of those groups are the breeds that are placed in that group.  Italian Greyhounds are placed in the Toy Group in both the CKC and the AKC.

The whole process of dog shows is like a pyramid, where at the end of the day, only one dog wins Best in Show.

The classes are broken down like this:

classes

The column on the left hand side is what we call 'the classes'. Most of the time, the dogs in the classes are not Champions. You can show a Champion in the classes, but most people move the dog to the Specials class (Best of Breed class in the US) once they get their title. Some people will leave the dog in the classes if it finishes at a certain show, rather than risk 'breaking the points' (reducing the number of Championship points available by reducing the number of dogs in competition). This is done as a courtesy to other exhibitors.

Only dogs in the classes can get Championship points. Specials competitors are not eligible for Championship points as they already have theirs. They do, however, compete for a couple of different sets of points, which we will cover under "After The Championship".

In competition, they always start with the class males, and always with the youngest class first.  The judge will evaluate each entry based on how well it conforms to the breed standard.  He will physically examine each dog and have each dog move around the ring.  Each class is judged and awarded 1st to 4th place, assuming there are enough dogs in the ring to offer that many placings. Whichever dogs win 1st and 2nd must remain until Winners is judged.

After each male class is judged, then the 1st place winner of each class is called back in for Winners Dog or Winners Male. One dog is selected for Winners, and that is the only male that gets Championship points.  At that time, the dog who was 2nd to that dog in it's regular class is now called back in the ring with the remaining 1st place winners to be judged for Reserve Winners.  One dog is selected. That dog does not get any points, but if for any reason the points are taken away from the Winners Male in the future, they are awarded retroactively to the Reserve Winner.

The Winners Male must stay ringside to await Best of Breed judging.  If the Winners Male is a puppy, all the rest of the class males are done for the day.  If the Winners Male is not a puppy and there were no puppies in his class, and the Reserve Winners is not a puppy, all the puppies who placed highest in their class must remain for Best Puppy judging after Breed judging.

After Reserve Winners Male, the process is started all over again for the females.

After Reserve Winners Female, or Bitch (not a bad word in dogs!), then all the Champions are called into the ring, along with the Winners Male and the Winners Bitch. All are judged together for Best of Breed.  If the Best of Breed dog is a bitch, the judge then chooses the best male out of the Champions and the Winners Male for the Best of Opposite award. The reverse is true if the Best of Breed dog is a male.  Additionally, the judge will award a Best of Winners, from the Winners Male and the Winners Bitch.  If a class dog wins Best of Breed, it is automatically Best of Winners.

Now, explaining the Best Puppy in Breed win is a little complicated. Even long time show people get confused by it. My best advice is, if you have a puppy and you were the highest placed puppy in your class, stick around until the judging is done.  Listen for the ring steward to call your number. If they don't call it, you're fine, if they do, then get in the ring.

My best advice to any new exhibitor is to stick around until the breed AFTER IGs enters the ring.  Then you know for sure you didn't miss any judging you might have been eligible for.

Best Puppy in Breed is judged after Best of Breed. If a puppy wins Best of Breed, it is automatically Best Puppy in Breed.  A puppy does not have to be entered in a puppy class to be eligible for the puppy wins, but they must just be under 12 months of age.

The Best of Breed winner is required to remain for further judging. The Best Puppy in Breed winner is not required to remain unless it is also the Best of Breed winner.

After all of the breeds in your group are judged, the Best of Breed winners are called in together to compete in the Group. The judge will select 1st to 4th placings.  If the Group Winner is a puppy, it is also automatically Best Puppy in Group, which really sucks if you have been waiting all day with your puppy to go  into Best Puppy in Group.  If the 2nd, 3rd or 4th in Group winner is a puppy, it comes back in to compete with the Best Puppy of the breeds that placed above it. Any puppies of breeds that placed below the puppy do not compete for Best Puppy in Group as they have been indirectly eliminated.  If no puppy wins a Group Placing, then the Best Puppy in Breed of all the breeds in the Group come back to compete for Best Puppy in Group.  Only one Puppy is chosen, there is no additional placings.

The Group 1st winner and the Best Puppy in Group winner must now remain until the end of the show.  When all breeds and all Groups have been completed, the highlight of the day is judged... Best in Show!

The 7 Group winners compete and only 1 dog is awarded Best in Show.  (Some shows offer a Reserve Best in Show now).  By process of elimination, that dog has either directly or indirectly defeated every dog in the show. After Best in Show, the whole process is done over again for Best Puppy in Show, with the 7 Best Puppy in Group winners competing against each other for the one prize.  Again, if the Best in Show winner is a puppy, it is automatically Best Puppy in Show as well.

By the way, even if you are the only dog in your class, the judge is not obligated to award you first place. If the judge does not feel your dog is of sufficient quality, they can award a second place, or no ribbon at all. While they do have the right to do so, few judges avail themselves of that right. The dog usually has to be pretty bad before a judge will withhold.  I know of one circumstance where a judge awarded Winners Male, as it was the only male entered, and he was sure the upcoming females had to be better.  As it turned out, they weren't any better, so he withheld Winners Female and Best of Breed.  Judges really don't want to upset the exhibitors, but sometimes they just can't justify awarding points.

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Where do you find your Breed Standard?  They are available online from the  Canadian Kennel Club and the American Kennel Club.

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Why might a dog have his or her win taken away?  A dog may have been entered in the wrong class, it may have been entered with the wrong owner, it may not have gotten it's CKC registration within the allotted time frame.  Additionally, the handler may have shown the dog fraudulently, although that is rare!  There has been instances where an owner knows (or believes) a dog is not competitive, but is so greedy for titles, that they enter the dog, but show another dog in it's place fraudulently. They do this hoping no-one notices!  When they get caught (and it always when, not if) the wins will be revoked and the owner and handler may be subject to disciplinary action which may mean being banned from competing at CKC events.  People who do this are the dregs of the dog show society.

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Conformation championship points are awarded at Conformation Shows. To become a Conformation Champion, your dog must earn at least 10 points under at least three different judges and have earned at least one 2-point win, either at the breed or group level. Your dog must also be individually registered with the CKC or have an Event Registration Number.. 

The schedule used to determine the number of points awarded to the Winners is as follows:

*Includes the dog awarded Winners

In counting the number of eligible dogs in competition, a dog that is disqualified, dismissed, excused or ordered from the ring by the judge is still included in the calculation for championship points.

If a dog awarded Winners is also awarded Best of Breed at the show, then all dogs competing in the breed, including Specials Only, are included in the total.

If a dog awarded Winners is also awarded Best of Opposite Sex to Best of Breed, then all dogs of the same sex including those competing for Specials Only are included in the total.

If a dog awarded Winners is also awarded Best of Winners, then all dogs defeated directly or indirectly in the breed are included.

If a dog is awarded Winners only, then all the dogs of the same sex in the class competition shall be included. 

DOGS COMPETING

1

2

3-5

6-9

10-12

13+

POINTS ALLOCATED

0

1

2

3

4

5


In the US, you only get points at the Group level if you win a Group 1st, but dogs can win points for all Group Placings in Canada.   

Number of Breeds

First

Second

Third

Fourth

13+

5

4

3

2

10-12

4

3

2

1

6-9

3

2

1

1

5

2

1

1

1

4

2

1

1

0

3

2

1

0

0

2

1

0

0

0

1

0

0

0

0


In Canada, a dog can add the Breed points to the Group points, but never win more than 5 points at one show.

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 Continue to "Entering A Dog Show"

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